SPHERU engages in population health research – the study of social factors contributing to the well-being of various groups within the population.

Welcome to SPHERU

The Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit is a bi-university health research unit based at the Universities of Regina and Saskatchewan. Since 1999, SPHERU has established itself as a leader in cutting edge population health research that not only looks at what and the why of health inequities -– but also how to address these and take action.

What’s Happening at SPHERU

Pre-residential school children were healthy

In a recently published article in the International Journal of Circumpolar Health, findings from a study conducted by SPHERU researchers Paul Hackett and Sylvia Abonyi, and fellow University of Saskatchewan researcher Roland Dyck reveal that Indigenous children were healthy prior to entering residential schools. Researchers analyzed microfilm records of more than 1,700 children entering the schools between 1919 and the 1950s. The findings indicate that 80 per cent of the children were at a healthy weight, suggesting that many of the health problems that disproportionately affect Indigenous people today can be linked back to the residential school experience. In an editorial released alongside the article researchers reflect on the challenges of ethically carrying out archival research using public records where issues of consent and confidentiality are present. In the paper, researchers outline the strategies they took in an effort to mitigate these issues, including broad consultation with Indigenous partners, colleagues and organizations as the work unfolded. "Overwhelmingly, our Indigenous colleagues affirm that the data from the health examinations tells an important part of the residential school story and that they should be used for this type of scholarly research, despite the circumstances under which they were collected." The study has generated national, and international, interest with articles and interviews appearing in a number of media outlets, several of which are provided below. http://globalnews.ca/news/2792426/kids-were-healthy-before-residential-schools-study/?sf30287498=1 https://wcms.usask.ca/entity/edit.act?type=page&id=991ebaf280e9d2552d85b57600f14581 http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/indigenous-kids-were-healthy-before-they-were-sent-to-residential-schools-study-1.2965101 http://mbcradio.com/index.php/mbc-news/16513-new-research-suggests-indigenous-children-were-well-nourished-before-residential-schools http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/indigenous-kids-were-healthy-before-arrival-at-residential-schools-study/article30644277/ http://www.thecanadianpress.com/english/online/OnlineFullStory.aspx?filename=DOR-MNN-CP.ca9ec6be773347f785c53faec16b4bcf.CPKEY2008111303&newsitemid=37890727&languageid=1 https://psmag.com/how-boarding-schools-in-canada-made-native-children-less-healthy-d2ebab1f8ed1#.a4i0prnza     Full Article:  Anthropometric indices of First Nations children and youth on first entry to Manitoba/Saskatchewan residential schools—1919 to 1953 Editorial:  Reflections on ethical challenges encountered in Indigenous health research using archival records

SPHERU's Food Environment research published

Contributions by SPHERU food environment researchers have been included in a in a new series of papers entitled Retail Food Environments in Canada: Maximizing the Impact of Research, Policy and Practice, recently released in a supplement of the Canadian Journal of Public Health. The supplement, co-coordinated by Rachel Engler-Stringer, provides an overview of unhealthy food landscapes across Canada, and includes a commentary on the state of food environments research in Canada Retail food environments research: Promising future with more work to be done.  Co-authored by SPHERU's Daniel Fuller, Engler-Stringer and Nazeem Muhajarine, the commentary outlines key challenges in the field of food environments research. In addition to research on food deserts, or neighbourhoods where access to healthy food retailers is lacking, SPHERU researchers Engler-Stringer and Muhajarine have also looked at the impact of food swamps, neighbourhoods where fast-food outlets and convenience stores are clustered, and the concept of food mirages, where healthy food is available but not affordable. The research highlighted in the journal has generated interest within Canada and beyond, and has been featured in a number of stories in media outlets including CBC, Global, and Newswise.

SPHERU presents at CIHR Sparking Solutions

SPHERU was well represented at the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) Sparking Solutions conference in Ottawa in April, with two posters and a podium presentation.  The purpose of the summit was to facilitate a solutions-oriented dialogue that responded to one or more of six key questions, aimed at 'sparking solutions' for population health. A group poster entitled "Engaged Research as a Catalyst for Population Health Change: SPHERU's transformative work in Saskatchewan 1999-2015" was presented by Tom McIntosh. It highlighted the population health intervention model developed by SPHERU, providing examples from individual projects to answer questions of scalability, context, history and solutions outside the health sector. Dr. Nazeem Muhajarine also presented "If obesity is a post-modern scourge, don't we need to move beyond outdated solutions? along with a poster entltled "Changing inner-city food environments: From food desert/swamp to Good Food Junction Co-operative and beyond'

Study shows that health inequities persist

In a recent study funded by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF), University of Saskatchewan researchers with the Dept. of Community Health and Epidemiology and SPHERU  examined the impact of poverty and other social determinants of health on addressing health inequities within the province of Saskatchewan. Findings from the study, released in the report 'Changes in Social Inequalities in Health Over Time in Saskatchewan' suggest that poverty continues to negatively impact the health of the poorest among us. In an interview with the Saskatoon Star Phoenix lead author Dr. Cory Neudorf explained that in times of economic boom the effect can be amplified as housing and other costs rise.

SPHERU's work highlighted by SHRF

An article highlighting SPHERU’s work has been published in Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation’s (SHRF) Research for health magazine (Issue 3, December 2015).  The article focuses on the unit’s 15 year history of research and its connections – across research disciplines, with communities and policy makers, and to broad audiences through its knowledge translation strategies. By exploring how these multiple connections work together to produce new policy and program relevant knowledge for addressing health inequities among populations, the purpose and strength of the unit is revealed. The full article is available at www.shrf.ca/publications.

Healthy community approaches reviewed

SPHERU research assistant and PhD candidate Hazel Williams-Roberts is lead author on “The Effectiveness of Healthy Community Approaches on Positive Health Outcomes in Canada and the United States”, recently published in the journal Social Sciences.  The article, co-authored by SPHERU researchers Bonnie Jeffery, Shanthi Johnson and Nazeem Muhajarine, is based on a research project funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada.  The project reviewed a number of studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions using a healthy community approach, which aims to create supportive environments to improve health outcomes. Findings from the review indicate that these approaches have been relatively unexplored and more study needs to be done on specific projects to demonstrate their effectiveness.  The article is available for open access download at http://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/5/1/3.

SPHERU Newsletter

Issue 13
Oct 2015

Q&A with researcher Dr. Rachel Engler-Stringer

Photo Credit(s):
Northern and Aboriginal Health (SPHERU staff), Rural Health (Juanita Bacsu), Intervention Research (Hilary Gough), Healthy Children (Thilina Bandara), History of Health Inequities (Saskatchewan Archives Board)